Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ds.saudeindigena.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/bvs/1256
Title: Hepatitis B epidemiology and cultural practices in Amerindian populations of Amazonia: the Tupí-Mondé and the Xavánte from Brazil
Authors: Coimbra Junior, Carlos E. A.
Santos, Ricardo Ventura
Yoshida, Clara F. Y.
Baptista, Márcia L.
Flowers, Nancy M.
Valle, Antonio Carlos F. do
Affilliation: Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Museu Nacional. Departamento de Antropologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública. Departamento de Endemias. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. Museu Nacional. Departamento de Antropologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil / Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública. Departamento de Endemias. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Departamento de Virologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Departamento de Virologia. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
City University of New York. Hunter College. Department of Anthropology. New York, NY, USA
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Hospital Evandro Chagas. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil
Abstract: Hepatitis B infection and disease are highly endemic in South America. Prevalences of positivity are particularly high in Amazonia, and among Amerindian peoples in particular. This paper reports the results of a seroepidemiological survey for hepatitis B virus (HBV) carried out among four Amerindian populations from the Brazilian Amazon region: Gavião, Surui, Zoro and Navate. Rates of positivity to HBV serological markers (HBsAg, anti-HBs and or anti-HBc) are very high for the four groups, ranging from 62.8 to 95.7%. It is argued that the high rates of positivity in the Amerindian groups dealt with in this study, as well as for other Amazonian populations, are related to a complex of cultural practices which enhance the likelihood of HBV transmission (bloodletting, scarification, tattooing and orally processed food, among others). The authors suggest that, due to unique patterns of interaction between sociocultural and environmental factors. HBV infection assumes a specific profile in native Amazonian societies.
Keywords: Brasil
Índios Sul-Americanos
Região Norte
Saúde de Populações Indígenas
Mato Grosso
Região Amazônica
Epidemiologia
Região Centro-Oeste
Gavião
Suruí
Rondônia
Mortalidade
Xavante
Zoró
Morbidade
Hepatite B
Xavánte
Características Culturais
Sorologia
Doenças Infecciosas e Parasitárias
Doenças Endêmicas
Grupos de Risco
HBV
DeCS: Brasil
Saúde de Populações Indígenas
Índios Sul-Americanos
Ecossistema Amazônico
Epidemiologia
Mortalidade
Morbidade
Hepatite B
Características Culturais
Sorologia
Doenças Endêmicas
Vírus da Hepatite B
Doenças Infecciosas
Issue Date: 1996
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: COIMBRA JR., Carlos E. A.. et al.Hepatitis B epidemiology and cultural practices in Amerindian populations of Amazonia: the Tupí-Mondé and the Xavánte from Brazil. Social Science & Medicine, v. 42, n. 12, p. 1735-1743, 1996.
ISSN: 0277-9536/96
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:DIP - Artigos de Periódicos
EPI - Artigos de Periódicos

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
832984704.pdf842.89 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.