Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ds.saudeindigena.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/bvs/5882
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Alaidistania Aparecida-
dc.contributor.authorSouza-Filho, Zilmar Augusto-
dc.contributor.authorGonçalves, Maria Jacirema F.-
dc.contributor.authorSantos, Juliano-
dc.contributor.authorPierin, Angela Maria G.-
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-18T17:10:29Z-
dc.date.available2022-01-18T17:10:29Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationFERREIRA, Alaidistania Aparecida; et al. Relationship between alcohol drinking and arterial hypertension in indigenous people of the Mura ethnics, Brazil. PLoS ONE, v. 12, n. 8, 2017en_US
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://ds.saudeindigena.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/bvs/5882-
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (Estados Unidos)en_US
dc.rightsopen accessen_US
dc.subject.otherRegião Amazônicaen_US
dc.subject.otherMuráen_US
dc.subject.otherDoenças e Agravos Não Transmissíveisen_US
dc.titleRelationship between alcohol drinking and arterial hypertension in indigenous people of the Mura ethnics, Brazilen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Amazonas. Escola de Enfermagem de Manaus. Manaus, AM, Brasilen_US
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Amazonas. Escola de Enfermagem de Manaus. Manaus, AM, Brasilen_US
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade Federal do Amazonas. Escola de Enfermagem de Manaus. Manaus, AM, Brasil/ Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane. Manaus, AM, Brasilen_US
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade de São Paulo. Escola de Enfermagem. São Paulo, SP, Brasilen_US
dc.creator.affilliationUniversidade de São Paulo. Escola de Enfermagem. São Paulo, SP, Brasilen_US
dc.description.abstractenObjective To identify the consumption of alcoholic beverage and the relation with hypertension, their prevalence and associated factors, in indigenous Mura, Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with 455 adult indigenous aged 18 years or more of Mura ethnics in Amazonia, Brazil. Interview was conducted and the alcohol intake was assessed by the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Blood pressure was measured in three measurements and the mean of the last two measurements was used. Physical examination included the following data: weight, height, waist and neck circumference, bioimpedance, and capillary measurement of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. Through multivariate Logistic regression in stepwise, the odds ratios for alcohol consumption and associated factors were identified. Results The prevalence of alcoholic beverage was 40.2%, with no significant difference for hypertension in those who drink (23.0%) and those who did not drink (29.0%). Referred hypertension in indigenous was associated to less use of alcoholic beverages (14.2% vs 24.3%, P = 0.009). After an adjusted analysis (Odds Ratio, 95% CI), there was a positive association between alcoholic drink intake and male sex (10.27, CI: 5.76–18.30), smoking (4.72, CI: 2.35–9.46) and live in rural areas (9.77, CI: 5.08–18.79). On the other hand, age (0.95, IC: 0.94–0.97), and absence of dyslipidemia (0.41, CI: 0.19–0.89) were associated to lower alcohol consumption. Conclusion The prevalence of alcoholic beverage was high and associated with referred hypertension, but this association was not maintained after adjusted analysis. Changes to habits and inappropriate lifestyles in indigenous populations and living in urban areas may contribute to increase risk for cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, health policies should be implemented to meet the uniqueness of indigenous peopleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0182352-
dc.subject.decsBrasilen_US
dc.subject.decsSaúde de Populações Indígenasen_US
dc.subject.decsÍndios Sul-Americanosen_US
dc.subject.decsConsumo de Bebidas Alcoólicasen_US
dc.subject.decsEstudos Epidemiológicosen_US
Appears in Collections:DANT - Artigos de Periódicos

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
363894617.pdf1.01 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.