Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ds.saudeindigena.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/bvs/6810
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dc.contributor.authorKrsulovic, Felipe Augusto Maurines_ES
dc.contributor.authorCasares, Fernanda Araujopt_BR
dc.contributor.authorLima, Mauricioes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-12T13:18:37Z-
dc.date.available2022-04-12T13:18:37Z-
dc.date.issued2019en_US
dc.identifier.citationKRSULOVIC, Felipe Augusto Maurin; CASARES, Fernanda Araujo; LIMA, Mauricio. Agricultural frontiers, health care, and population size impact the recovery patterns of brazilian indigenous nations. Human Ecology, v. 47, p. 275-290, 7 May 2019.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0300-7839en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://ds.saudeindigena.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/bvs/6810-
dc.description.sponsorshipFAMK and FAC was supported by PhD scholarships from CONICYT and Pontificia Catholic University of Chile. ML was supported by Fondo Basal-CONICYT grant FB-0002 and Proyecto Fondecyt Regular 1141164.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rightsopen accessen_US
dc.subject.otherRegião Amazônicapt_BR
dc.subject.otherDesmatamentopt_BR
dc.titleAgricultural frontiers, health care, and population size impact the recovery patterns of brazilian indigenous nationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.creator.affilliationPontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago, Chile.es_ES
dc.creator.affilliationInstituto Brasileiro de Biodiversidade. Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil.pt_BR
dc.creator.affilliationPontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Santiago, Chile.es_ES
dc.description.abstractenAfter centuries of decline, the populations of indigenous nations in Brazil began to increase in the 1970s. Population Ecology theory predicts that population size affects the dynamics of three basic recovery patterns: intra-specific cooperation (a positive effect of population size); competition (a negative effect); and exponential growth (no effect of population size). We analyzed the dynamics and recent history of 25 Brazilian indigenous populations using a cross-sectional approach to understand how exogenous and cultural variables (e.g., deforestation, diet richness) interact with population levels. We found that population size, access to health care, the extent of indigenous territories, and degree of deforestation impact the recovery of indigenous population levels.en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1572-9915en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10745-019-0069-4en_US
dc.subject.decsBrasilpt_BR
dc.subject.decsÍndios Sul-Americanospt_BR
dc.subject.decsAtenção à Saúdept_BR
dc.subject.decsEcossistema Amazônicopt_BR
dc.subject.decsSaúde de Populações Indígenaspt_BR
dc.subject.decsConservação dos Recursos Naturaispt_BR
dc.subject.enDeforestationen_US
dc.subject.enHealth careen_US
dc.subject.enIntra-population processesen_US
dc.subject.enIndigenous populationsen_US
dc.subject.enLocal environmental knowledgeen_US
dc.subject.enLand rightsen_US
dc.subject.enBrazilen_US
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