Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ds.saudeindigena.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/bvs/6940
Title: The microbiome of uncontacted Amerindians
Authors: Clemente, Jose C.
Pehrsson, Erica C.
Blaser, Martin J.
Sandhu, Kuldip
Gao, Zhan
Wang, Bin
Magris, Magda
Hidalgo, Glida
Contreras, Monica
Noya-Alarcón, Óscar
Lander, Orlana
McDonald, Jeremy
Cox, Mike
Walter, Jens
Oh, Phaik Lyn
Ruiz, Jean F.
Rodriguez, Selena
Shen, Nan
Song, Se Jin
Metcalf, Jessica
Knight, Rob
Dantas, Gautam
Dominguez-Bello, M. Gloria
Affilliation: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences. New York, NY, USA / Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Immunology Institute. New York, NY, USA.
Washington University School of Medicine. Center for Genome Sciences & Systems Biology. St. Louis, MO, USA.
VA Medical Center. Laboratory Service. New York, NY, USA / New York University School of Medicine. New York, NY, USA.
New York University School of Medicine. New York, NY, USA.
New York University School of Medicine. New York, NY, USA.
Washington University School of Medicine. Center for Genome Sciences & Systems Biology. St. Louis, MO, USA.
Amazonic Center for Research and Control of Tropical Diseases. Puerto Ayacucho, Venezuela.
Amazonic Center for Research and Control of Tropical Diseases. Puerto Ayacucho, Venezuela.
Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research. Caracas, Venezuela.
Amazonic Center for Research and Control of Tropical Diseases. Puerto Ayacucho, Venezuela.
Universidad Central de Venezuela. Instituto de Medicina Tropical. Sección de Ecología Parasitaria. Caracas, Venezuela.
Anaerobe Systems. Morgan Hill, CA, USA.
Anaerobe Systems. Morgan Hill, CA, USA.
University of Nebraska. Department of Food Science and Technology. Lincoln, NE, USA.
University of Nebraska. Department of Food Science and Technology. Lincoln, NE, USA.
University of Puerto Rico. Department of Biology. Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico.
University of Puerto Rico. Department of Biology. Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico.
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences. New York, NY, USA.
University of Colorado. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Boulder, CO, USA.
University of Colorado. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Boulder, CO, USA.
University of Colorado. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Boulder, CO, USA / University of Colorado. Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Boulder, CO, USA.
Washington University School of Medicine. Center for Genome Sciences & Systems Biology. St. Louis, MO, USA / Washington University School of Medicine. Department of Pathology and Immunology. St. Louis, MO, USA.
New York University School of Medicine. New York, NY, USA / Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research. Caracas, Venezuela / University of Puerto Rico. Department of Biology. Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico.
Abstract: Most studies of the human microbiome have focused on westernized people with life-style practices that decrease microbial survival and transmission, or on traditional societies that are currently in transition to westernization. We characterize the fecal, oral, and skin bacterial microbiome and resistome of members of an isolated Yanomami Amerindian village with no documented previous contact with Western people. These Yanomami harbor a microbiome with the highest diversity of bacteria and genetic functions ever reported in a human group. Despite their isolation, presumably for >11,000 years since their ancestors arrived in South America, and no known exposure to antibiotics, they harbor bacteria that carry functional antibiotic resistance (AR) genes, including those that confer resistance to synthetic antibiotics and are syntenic with mobilization elements. These results suggest that westernization significantly affects human microbiome diversity and that functional AR genes appear to be a feature of the human microbiome even in the absence of exposure to commercial antibiotics. AR genes are likely poised for mobilization and enrichment upon exposure to pharmacological levels of antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the need for extensive characterization of the function of the microbiome and resistome in remote nonwesternized populations before globalization of modern practices affects potentially beneficial bacteria harbored in the human body.
Keywords: Região Amazônica
Yanomami
DeCS: Brasil
Índios Sul-Americanos
Ecossistema Amazônico
Saúde de Populações Indígenas
Venezuela
Fenômenos Microbiológicos
Microbiota
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science
Citation: CLEMENTE, Jose C. et al. The microbiome of uncontacted Amerindians. Science Advances, v. 1, n. 3, p. 1-12, 17 Apr. 2015.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1126/sciadv.1500183
ISSN: 2375-2548
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:TR - Artigos de Periódicos

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