Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ds.saudeindigena.icict.fiocruz.br/handle/bvs/7048
Title: Comparison of black fly species (Diptera: Simuliidae) on an amerindian reservation with a high prevalence of fogo selvagem to neighboring disease-free sites in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil
Authors: Eaton, Donald P.
Diaz, Luis A.
Hans-Filho, Gunter
Santos, Vandir dos
Aoki, Valeria
Friedman, Horacio
Rivitti, Evandro A.
Sampaio, Sebastiao A. P.
Gottlieb, Mark S.
Giudice, George J.
Lopez, Argelia
Cupp, Eddie W.
THE COOPERATIVE GROUP ON FOGO SELVAGEM RESEARCH
Affilliation: University of Nevada. Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology. Reno, NV, USA.
Medical College of Wisconsin. Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Departments of Dermatology. Milwaukee, WI, USA / Medical College of Wisconsin. Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Departments of Biochemistry. Milwaukee, WI, USA.
Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul. Departamento de Dermatologia. Campo Grande, MS, Brasil.
Governo do Estado do Mato Grosso do Sul. Secretaria de Estado de Saúde. Campo Grande, MS, Brasil.
Universidade de São Paulo. Departamento de Dermatologia. São Paulo, SP, Brasil.
Universidade de São Paulo. Departamento de Dermatologia. São Paulo, SP, Brasil.
Governo do Estado do Mato Grosso do Sul. Secretaria de Estado de Saúde. Campo Grande, MS, Brasil.
Universidade de São Paulo. Departamento de Dermatologia. São Paulo, SP, Brasil.
Medical College of Wisconsin. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Milwaukee, WI, USA / Medical College of Wisconsin. Department of Family and Community Medicine. Health Policy Institute. Milwaukee, WI, USA.
Medical College of Wisconsin. Departments of Dermatology and Biochemistry. Milwaukee, WI, USA / Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Palm Beach, FL, USA.
Medical College of Wisconsin. Departments of Dermatology and Biochemistry. Milwaukee, WI, USA / Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Palm Beach, FL, USA.
Auburn University. Department of Entomology. Auburn, AL, USA.
Sem afiliação.
Abstract: Fogo selvagem is an autoimmune blistering skin disease that principally occurs among rural Brazilians living in geographically clumped disease foci. Exposure to hematophagous black flies possibly is related to the cause of the disease. We compared the occurrence, proportions, and richness of sirnuliid species immatures and the biting activity of adult females within a recently discovered, high prevalence focus of fogo selvagem, the Limao Verde Terena Reservation, to that of neighboring regions with no reported cases of fogo selvagem. Nine black fly species were collected from 12 stream sites during 5 trips to the fogo selvagem focus. The species showed longitudinal (upstream-downstream) trends in occurrence, proportions, and richness, and the abundance of simuliid immatures was greater at downstream sites. The most prevalent species at the focus, Simulium nigrimanum (Macquart), dominated the stream sites with highly abundant simuliid assemblages, and was the most common black fly in human bait collections. This species was absent or in very low numbers in neighboring valleys and villages that did not have cases of fogo selvagem.
Keywords: Simulium nigrimanum
Simuliidae
Fogo selvagem
Amerindians
Brazil
Keywords: Fogo selvagem
Pênfigo foliáceo
Insetos hematófagos
Simulium nigrimanum
Terra indígena Limão Verde
Terena
DeCS: Brasil
Saúde de Populações Indígenas
Índios Sul-Americanos
Simuliidae
Doenças Endêmicas
Issue Date: 1998
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Citation: EATON, Donald P. et al. Comparison of black fly species (Diptera: Simuliidae) on an amerindian reservation with a high prevalence of fogo selvagem to neighboring disease-free sites in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Journal of Medical Entomology, v. 35, n. 2, p. 120-131, 1 Mar. 1998.
metadata.dc.identifier.doi: 10.1093/jmedent/35.2.120
ISSN: 0022-2585
Copyright: open access
Appears in Collections:TR - Artigos de Periódicos

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
ve_Donald_Eaton_1998.pdf1.55 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.